August 14, 2021 science articles 2021 august Science News
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August 14, 2021 science articles 2021 august Science News
Research into what makes us tick has been messy and contentious, but has led to intriguing insights. An old star that formed from an explosive event called a magnetorotational hypernova is revealing where elements like uranium and silver might be forged. Whole beetles preserved in fossilized poo suggest that ancient droppings may deserve a closer look. In 2018, scientists found evidence for water lakes sitting beneath the southern Martian ice cap. New evidence suggests the lakes might not exist. Within six days, an Antarctic lake with twice the volume of San Diego Bay drained away, leaving a deep sinkhole filled with fractured ice.
A changing climate in Congo is affecting how scientists count bonobos’ nests, possibly skewing estimates of the great ape population, a study suggests. August 14, 2021 science articles 2021 august Science News
August 14, 2021 science articles 2021 august Science News
Science News was founded in 1921 as an independent, nonprofit source of accurate information on the latest news of science, medicine and technology. Today, our mission remains the same: to empower people to evaluate the news and the world around them. It is published by the Society for Science, a nonprofit 501 membership organization dedicated to public engagement in scientific research and education. Missed shots due to the pandemic may have cut vaccination rates for measles, diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis to their lowest levels in over a decade. Independent Journalism Since 1921 Search Open search Close search Science News Independent Journalism Since 1921 All Topics Earth Agriculture Climate Oceans Environment Humans Anthropology Health & Medicine Archaeology Psychology Life Animals Plants Ecosystems Paleontology Neuroscience Genetics Microbes Physics Materials Science Quantum Physics Particle Physics Space Astronomy Planetary Science Cosmology Tech Computing Artificial Intelligence Chemistry Math Science & Society All Topics Life Life Animals Plants Ecosystems Paleontology Neuroscience Genetics Microbes Environment 50 years ago, chemical pollutants were linked to odd animal behavior By Aina Abell 17 hours ago Animals A newfound boa sports big eyes and a square nose By Erin Garcia de Jesús 20 hours ago Life Infants may laugh like some apes in their first months of life By Carolyn Wilke September 9, 2021 Humans Humans Anthropology Health & Medicine Archaeology Psychology Life Infants may laugh like some apes in their first months of life By Carolyn Wilke September 9, 2021 Earth This pictogram is one of the oldest known accounts of earthquakes in the Americas By Carolyn Gramling September 7, 2021 Health & Medicine How personalized brain organoids could help us demystify disorders By Laura Sanders September 3, 2021 Earth Earth Agriculture Climate Oceans Environment Environment 50 years ago, chemical pollutants were linked to odd animal behavior By Aina Abell 17 hours ago Earth Clouds affected by wildfire smoke may produce less rain By Rachel Crowell September 9, 2021 Agriculture Cold plasma could transform the sustainable farms of the future By Stephen Ornes September 8, 2021 Space Space Astronomy Planetary Science Cosmology Planetary Science NASA’s Perseverance rover snagged its first Martian rock samples By Lisa Grossman 12 hours ago Cosmology Astronomers may have seen a star gulp down a black hole and explode By Adam Mann September 2, 2021 Astronomy How radio astronomy put new eyes on the cosmos By Christopher Crockett August 31, 2021 Physics Physics Materials Science Quantum Physics Particle Physics Agriculture Cold plasma could transform the sustainable farms of the future By Stephen Ornes September 8, 2021 Physics New ‘vortex beams’ of atoms and molecules are the first of their kind By Emily Conover September 2, 2021 Physics Physicists caught protons ‘surfing’ on shock waves By Emily Conover August 26, 2021 Coronavirus Science News Magazine: August 14, 2021 Vol. science articles 2021 august 200 No. 3 Read Digital Issue Archive Issues « Previous | Next » Cover Story What science tells us about reducing coronavirus spread from wind instruments Performers struggled to find evidence that would free them from musical lockdown, so they partnered with researchers to get some answers. Subscribers, enter your e-mail address to access the digital replica edition. A new study suggests that there aren’t more hurricanes now than there were roughly 150 years ago. Analyses of seismic waves picked up by NASA’s InSight lander shed new light on the planet’s core and give clues to the thickness of the crust. Water and ice helped form the Yukon River’s delta. Now, climate change is reshaping it. Some of the exclusively human tweaks to DNA may have played a role in brain evolution. For the smallest mammal in the ocean, staying warm is a challenge. Now, scientists have figured out how the animals keep themselves toasty. Fifty years after a false-alarm discovery, physicists have caught the W boson and are using it to unravel mysteries of particle physics. ‘Bright Galaxies, Dark Matter, and Beyond’ tells the story of how astronomer Vera Rubin provided key evidence for the existence of dark matter. Editor in chief Nancy Shute discusses the evolution of behavioral science research over the past century. Nonimmune cells can fight off pathogens by releasing a detergent-like molecule that dissolves bacterial membranes. Experiments with stone lamps and juniper branch torches are helping scientists see 12,500-year-old cave art with fresh eyes. The structure and chemistry of these ancient cell-like fossils may hint where Earth’s early inhabitants evolved and how they got their energy. Trustworthy journalism comes at a price. Scientists and journalists share a core belief in questioning, observing and verifying to reach the truth. Science News reports on crucial research and discovery across science disciplines. We need your financial support to make it happen – every contribution makes a difference. A 93-year-old Xerces blue specimen’s DNA shows that the butterfly is a distinct species, making it the first U.S. insect humans drove to extinction. Data from the Event Horizon Telescope reveal new details of jets spewing from the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy Centaurus A. The first black hole merger detected by LIGO affirms that the surface area of a black hole can increase over time, but not decrease. To feed on plant xylem sap, a nutrient-poor liquid locked away under negative pressure, froghoppers have to suck harder than any known creature. science articles for teens